Checking the Hanzi for some basic Hokkien words

Discussions on the Hokkien (Minnan) language.
Andrew

Post by Andrew » Tue May 03, 2005 11:02 pm

su7/si7/sy7

Barclay gives jip8-su7 as meaning "to go from Singapore to Penang".
[/quote]
hong

Post by hong » Tue May 03, 2005 11:45 pm

Yes,
It should be 檳榔嶼 but I see china newspapers use 檳榔城﹐檳榔島嶼﹐檳榔島 .So I just sinply copy one.
Mark Yong
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I found the Hanzi for "tam" (wet)!

Post by Mark Yong » Fri May 06, 2005 5:06 pm

I found the character for 'tam' (wet). 夏門方言志 quotes the 集韻 as follows: "耽 (add 三點水 to it; this character is non-standard), 者含切, 湿也.
hong

Post by hong » Fri May 06, 2005 11:59 pm

Yes,I agree above word is the correct hanzi but I can't understand Prof.Chiu who wrote xiamenfangyancidian put 澹 which is only has the meaning quiet .Many taiwanese also put this word
Mark Yong
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Post by Mark Yong » Wed Dec 28, 2005 7:49 am

Another word in Penang Hokkien for "near" is 'uâ'. I notice it is normally used for physical proximity of people or objects, rather than distance between localities (in which case, 'kin' 近 is used). Of course, on occasion, I have heard it used for proximity of locations, i.e. "ua ta-lo" (Mandarin 靠近那裡).

1. Is the 'hanzi' for "ua" 挨, 邇 (both words mean 'near') or something else?
2. Is it the same 'hanzi' as the Cantonese "măai"?

Regards,
Mark
hong

Post by hong » Wed Dec 28, 2005 8:08 am

倚 baidu is the hanzi.catonese use 埋。
niuc
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Location: Singapore

Post by niuc » Thu Jan 12, 2006 10:13 am

Taiwanese usually write 偎 for ua2, so i1-ua2 = 依偎. Or should i1-ua2 = 依依? Btw 依偎 is also used in Mandarin.
ong
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Post by ong » Thu Jan 12, 2006 11:00 am

In 泉州市方言志 it is 文白读 for the same word 倚倚 i ua.
tantg
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Re: Checking the Hanzi for some basic Hokkien words

Post by tantg » Thu Jan 12, 2006 8:15 pm

Mark Yong wrote: ...
I notic that Minnan makes a distinction between "smoke" (ean7) and "tobacco" (hun7) that modern Mandarin and Yue does not. Could it be a historic convergence of 煙 and 菸 in Mandarin and Yue, with the different pronunciations now preserved in Min?
Any chance tobacco hun7 is 薰?
ong
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Post by ong » Fri Jan 13, 2006 1:41 am

薰 hun1
Mark Yong
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Post by Mark Yong » Sun Jan 15, 2006 9:55 am

Is the hanzi for the quantifier for 'one roll', i.e. "kh'un" 卷?
ong
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Post by ong » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:54 pm

卷 kng 3 or kng 3 貫 for 串
ong
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Post by ong » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:55 pm

卷 kng 3 or kng 3 贯 for 串
ong
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Post by ong » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:55 pm

卷 kng 3 or kng 3 贯 for 串
tantg
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2005 7:39 pm

Post by tantg » Tue Jan 17, 2006 5:22 pm

ong wrote:薰 hun1
That was in reply to my suggestion ---
Any chance tobacco hun7 is 薰?

Well, I merely quoted Mark Yong's tonal notation in his question in the first place. Mark: what *is* your tonal system?

Anyway, another possibility that "hun" in tobacco/cigaratte is 燻, from the following line in another thread

烏燻間 ou-hun-keng = 鴉片館 (opium den)
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