why?

Discussions on the Hakka dialects.
Ji

why?

Postby Ji » Mon Apr 30, 2001 8:34 pm

I M A CHINESE, WHY I CAN SPEAK 3 LANGUAGES OF CHINESE?
MOST OF THE CHINESE CAN SPEAK SEVERAL DIALECTS.
I CAN SPEAK HAKKA , CANTONESE, ADN PUTONGHUA

Lisa C

Re: why?

Postby Lisa C » Mon Apr 30, 2001 9:24 pm

Is there a question? Nice you can speak 3 dialects.

Sb

Re: why?

Postby Sb » Mon Jul 02, 2001 2:04 pm

Wow good for you... I wish I were you

innitra

Re: why?

Postby innitra » Tue May 28, 2002 8:17 pm

maybe next you should try to master english

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Thu Jun 27, 2002 4:16 am

XD

I think it's because you somehow magically learnt them thru immersion when you were a young child.

Somehow, you seem to have left your English skills at that age as well XD

Well, as this is a Hakka forum, I guess you don't really need to know English. But, if you are going to post in English, please try to make some sense.

If you mean most Chinese know more dialects than you, too bad for you! Quite a few of the peoples of Earth only know-- get this-- ONE LANGUAGE! Don't you feel lucky now?

Zaijian

James Campbell

Re: why?

Postby James Campbell » Sat Jun 29, 2002 6:09 am

Isn't there a saying that the people who know only one language are called American?

Most the people of the earth are multilingual. In fact, in most countries there is exposure to more than one language, and most everybody growing up today studies English. So it's safe to say that most people in the world know at least one or two local languages in addition to their study of English.

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Sun Jun 30, 2002 1:04 pm

That's quite true, however there are still a few places where exposure to multiple languages is uncommon for those who speak a more standard language such as Putonghua as their native language in an area where it is spoken widely as a native language. This could perhaps be Standard German, or one of a few others.

However, most of these people learn ENGLISH as a second language, ruling out basically everybody /but/ Americans, and even nowadays many Americans are bilingual *gasp*

I think the Americans that are bilingual are mostly Hispanics and people who learned a second language in school, such as German, French, Spanish, or a LCTL (ie Mandarin, that's taught in my town at secondary school for 4 years, so is Japanese, as is Navajo, with Russian, French, Spanish, Latin, and a few more)

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Sun Sep 22, 2002 8:39 am

Coming back after my leave of absence due to not checking this site regularly since about 2 weeks since it went down, I look upon this topic and I can't stop laughing.

"I M A CHINESE, WHY I CAN SPEAK 3 LANGUAGES OF CHINESE?
MOST OF THE CHINESE CAN SPEAK SEVERAL DIALECTS.
I CAN SPEAK HAKKA , CANTONESE, ADN PUTONGHUA"

My answer to you, Ji, is:

The reason you can speak 3 Chinese languages is because you know the rules of grammar and vocabulary to the extent of at least the average high school student (probably, although this cannot be said of your English skills which seem to be quite a few years lower), as well as having knowledge of idiomatic expressions (probably).

I'm surprised anybody had to explain this to you... DUH.

matt

Re: why?

Postby matt » Thu Oct 17, 2002 6:38 pm

i can speak eng,cantonese,hakkaese and mandarin so i can speak 4!is notthat special to be able to speak 3 languages!

James Campbell

Re: why?

Postby James Campbell » Fri Oct 18, 2002 11:33 am

Since you bring it up and I don't mean to boast but if you think 4 is special:

I speak English, German, Italian, Russian, Mandarin, Minnan, and Wu, in addition to reading ability in French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovenian, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Malay, and Indonesian. In addition to those I have basic ability in Cantonese, Hakka, Arabic, Mongolian, Uyghur, Turkish, Hungarian, and Hindi.

If you add them up, that's 7 languages I speak, 19 more I comprehend, and 8 more with basic abilities. That's 34, so, 3 or 4 languages in comparison is nothing special.

Those 19 languages of comprehension would only require about 3 or 4 weeks in that location for me to acquire a good speaking ability, since I have already studied much of their related vocabulary and grammar. So if I had the time and money to do about 20 months of globe-trotting in the right spots with the right environment and regimen, I would be able to speak 26 languages within 2 years. I don't find it very difficult if you have your own system of categorizing vocabulary and a good memory.

I also claim that I can learn an unrelated language I've never touched before in 5-6 weeks as long as I have full-time available, and contact with a native speaker.

So to answer the question WHY? Because it's fun and a very pleasant experience that opens you up to new cultures and peoples. For somebody like me, it's great because I'm in constant contact with multinationals every week.

Hey, Mark, how about yourself? I was under the impression that you know quite a few yourself, including the Chinese ones. Kannst du auch einige Europäische Sprachen? Hoantsai, goa ma guanyi ka li sia banlam-oe e phoe, tse si kong, nasi li u chhubi, tioh ka goa lianlok. Goa chin hoaNhi u chit-e kihoe ka li anne liansip!

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Mon Oct 21, 2002 8:20 pm

James: if all my abilities were compounded into whole languages, I'd probably know about 5 or 6, but unfortunately as of yet I haven't "finished" learning any language other than English (although I do have reasonable success with "singlish" and a lot of the time I have success with pidgins and creoles, I had a dutch friend who claimed he knew Afrikaans once... sort of the same) meaning that I am not really fluent in anything other than English, but as for foreign languages, with vocabulary I feel most comfortable in Spanish, with grammar most comfortable in Japanese (lol, most people jump when I say I am more comfortable with Japanese grammar than I am Spanish even though I've had about the same time in each and Spanish grammar is generally easier for people with English as their 1st language to learn)

My linguistic skills are one big mess. I can do a bit of Mandarin (enough to impress Chinese friends at parties, I can ask for things or invite people in, and lots more, but it's still pretty basic), but my friend laughed at me, and said "you sound like mao zedong when you speak mandarin, you sound like a rural chinese who speaks a non-mandarin dialect as their first language"... lol.

I have found that I have skills beyond what I previously thought in French and Mandarin (sometimes I will find myself conversing with somebody in a language I previously thought I had almost 0 ability in)

Right now most of my time is consumed with an illness and I for sure do not have the time or the energy to travel abroad. Using a traditional chinese doctor (the teas he makes me drink are nasty, maybe you know that sort of stuff?) I have improved quite a bit and maybe I will be able to get back on track soon. (last fall I was going to officially start learning Mandarin, but alas my disease came out of remission and I had a flareup which kept me down to Japanese on Saturdays... how unfortunate)

I expect a fair bit of torture for this message, I was under the impression that some people were under the impression that I was a very impressive polyglot with knowledge of 30+ languages, maybe I can still accomplish that... but no, I do not know 30+ languages.

When I do get the chance to travel abroad I think I'll pick up the language quickly as I have a talent for learning languages which has surprised even myself.

I _can_ read Dutch a little bit, but it doesn't come easy for me and I've never taken formal Dutch lessons.

meh... long post all jumbled up.

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Mon Oct 21, 2002 8:26 pm

lol. Chinese ones? I can get along a bit in Mandarin, mostly what I do at the moment with Chinese languages involves unfortunately learning more about them than learning them, although I hope to change that this spring (and the way things are going now, I probably will)

To answer your question in the languages I can sort of speak...

日本語が分かる。 スペイン語も分かる。
Hablo Japonés y Español.

Of course I am quite proud (for some reason) of being able to read Portuguese without knowing what it means, to me it seems like an art (go to Brazil and see how people say "de"... it's not what people expect)

James Campbell

Re: why?

Postby James Campbell » Fri Oct 25, 2002 2:56 am

Mark,

I really feel not so good to hear about your disease, it does sound serious if it keeps you from doing regular activities. How did you get this disease?

Funny you say about Portuguese, because Brazil is supposed to be the easier one to understand, at least they pronounce "most" of their letters although they have all undergone a vowel shift different than most languages. However, the Prtgsh of Prtgl is the hrd one to undrstnd because although they write vowels in their words, they don't really pronounce them, they might as well be speaking something like Georgian Kartvelian, or write their language like Arabic.

Mark, how do you read Portuguese without knowing what it means? I think anybody can read any language and not know what it means, and should we call it an art? In fact I once picked up a Georgian linguistics book, and when I read that Georgian I sure didn't know what it meant.

By the way, this past week I had some initial contact with Finnish and it peaked my interest, definitely a language that I will investigate more of in the future and maybe even study fully one day. I couldn't even recognize or understand a single written word of that language.

Anne heN-iao, sui-jian li e-hiao kong zit-gi, a-mko goa si chinglai it-tit liah-chun li-e taigi si siuN-ho-e. so-i goa mng li, li-e taigi e lenglek anchoaN hianih ho, si tui to-ui oh-e? asi goa sia chit-e banlamoe li long khoaNbo?

(phaiN-se, ka goa siong-bin sia-e kangkhoan, sui-jian chia si khehka-e luntuaN, tansi goa sia khehka-oe long bue thong.)

James

Mark
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Re: why?

Postby Mark » Mon Dec 16, 2002 7:27 pm

>I really feel not so good to hear about your disease, it does sound serious
>if it keeps you from doing regular activities. How did you get this disease?

It isn't known yet how people get ulcerative colitis, but it's not contagious, and some say it may be related to stress.

>Funny you say about Portuguese, because Brazil is supposed to be the >easier one to understand, at least they pronounce "most" of their letters >although they have all undergone a vowel shift different than most >languages. However, the Prtgsh of Prtgl is the hrd one to undrstnd >because although they write vowels in their words, they don't really >pronounce them, they might as well be speaking something like Georgian >Kartvelian, or write their language like Arabic.

Haha, yes.

>Mark, how do you read Portuguese without knowing what it means?

>I think anybody can read any language and not know what it means, and >should we call it an art?

Nonono, most people you pass by in the street in most countries will not be able to read 日本書紀 to you, or a book in Chinese, or Georgian.

And reading Portuguese is very fun for me, because it's different than what I'm used to, and I think it sounds beautiful. (of course, anybody can say that about any language, but I think Portuguese sounds beautiful)

>In fact I once picked up a Georgian linguistics book, and when I read that >Georgian I sure didn't know what it meant.

Yes, but how many people in Taibei do you think could read that book?

>By the way, this past week I had some initial contact with Finnish and it >peaked my interest, definitely a language that I will investigate more of in >the future and maybe even study fully one day. I couldn't even recognize >or understand a single written word of that language.

Yes, it is an interesting language.

Kobo-Daishi

Re: why?

Postby Kobo-Daishi » Wed Dec 18, 2002 10:57 pm

Dear Mark,

> It isn't known yet how people get ulcerative colitis, but it's not contagious, and some say it may be related to stress.

Stress, huh. Then you should try to relax and “live and let live”.

Don’t be bothered by the little things (requests for tattoos in Chinese, the Chinese ‘alphabet’, a separate Cantonese republic for sum nut; posts by a Korean-centric fellow claiming everything for Korea, etc.)

When all else fails, remember that great Beatles song “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” with the lyrics that go “Picture yourself in a boat on a river with tangerine trees and marmalade skies. Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly. The girl with colitis goes by.”

:)

Can you believe that some people actually think that “the girl with colitis goes by” is what John’s singing in the song?

If you do a search of “kaleidoscope eyes” and “colitis” you get 73 “hits” at "Google".

Kobo-Daishi, PLLA.


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